Concours photo « Hiver »

Face au succès de son dernier concours photos sur le thème « Lights », Objectif Polytech, la cellule audiovisuelle de l’école, a décidé de récidiver ! En ce mois de Janvier, c’est le thème « Hiver » qui est à l’honneur !

12 photos ont été proposées et soumises au vote des élèves. Ils avaient jusqu’à hier, vendredi 25 janvier à 18h pour donner leur avis !

Les résultats sont aujourd’hui connus. Le prix du jury est attribué à Titouan Larnicol ! Quant au prix du public, il est remporté par Niels Chapuis, à la tête de la Cellule Humani’terre et déjà récompensé par le prix du jury lors du précédent concours ! Félicitations !

Titouan Larnicol, prix du jury. Concours photos « Hiver », janvier 2019.
Niels Chapuis, prix du public. Concours photos « Hiver », janvier 2019.

Altran Esport Cup

Polytech Grenoble a été sélectionnée par l’entreprise Altran pour participer à leur première Esport Cup !

Les élèves ont jusqu’au 25 janvier (ce vendredi !) pour s’inscrire et défendre les couleurs de l’école ! De plus, les prix sont attractifs : 4000€ de Cashprize, 1500€ pour le vainqueur de chaque tournoi, et 500€ pour chaque finaliste !

2 tournois sont au programme : Hearthstone (nécessite un compte Blizzard (Battle net) sur PC, un ordinateur et le jeu Hearthstone sur PC) et FIFA 19 (nécessite une PS4 et un jeu FIFA 19)

Première étape, le tournoi de sélection qui aura lieu dans les locaux de l’école, le jeudi 14 février à partir de 19h00. Dans un esprit de convivialité autour d’un buffet, l’objectif sera de montrer ses compétences devant tous les gamers inscrits. Altran Grenoble sera également présent.

Seconde étape, la finale, qui aura lieu le 6 avril à Paris ! Les participants pourront affronter les 2 meilleurs gamers d’Altran. De plus, l’école prendra en charge les frais de déplacement !

Le BDH organise sa collecte de vêtements

Les vêtements s’accumulent dans votre placard et vous n’en portez pas la moitié ? Le bureau de l’Humani’terre vous propose de les récupérer !

Du 14 au 31 janvier, déposez les habits dont vous ne voulez plus dans le carton de collecte dans le hall de l’école ! Vêtements, chaussures, gants, vestes… Tout est bon pour venir en aide aux plus démunis ! En effet, les dons seront remis à la Croix Rouge puis redistribués aux personnes dans le besoin ! L’occasion de faire un beau geste en ce début d’année !

On compte sur vous !

Trophée Polytech Neige 2019

On the weekend of the 25th of January, the Bureau des élèves of Polytech Annecy-Chambéry is organising the annual Trophée Polytech Neige (TPN). Every year the responsibility of organising the event is passed between Polytech Grenoble, Clermont-Ferrand and Annecy-Chambéry, next year the BDE of Polytech Grenoble will be given the organisational role.

This year it takes place in the skiing domain of Puy-Saint-Vincent, a commune of the Hautes-Alpes department. The skiing domain has 75km of marked slopes with altitudes between 1400m and 2749m.

Over the weekend around 400 students will have the occasion to ski and exchange and create relationships with students from the entire Polytech network. The 3 day event consists of access to a skiing domain, with various activities and competitions being organised. Accommodation, meals and transport are provided.

The participants will be able to compete in skiing competitions, a cheerleader competition, and a cart race with the carts being constructed by the students.

Faiz, Fatin and Sabrina: The Malaysian students of Polytech Grenoble – Interview

The moment I learned there were Malaysians students in Polytech Grenoble I was immediately intrigued. I had always been aware of France’s assets in terms of education and how attractive it is to foreign students. The diversity of the students that populate Grenoble is undeniably significant, although the foreign students you usually encounter tend to come from East Asia, Northern America or simply from Europe.

I met Fatin and Sabrina on the first day of the intensive English course where their story was brought to my attention during a dedicated “Mingle time”. After they quickly explained their background and where they came from, I remained curious about certain details. For instance, the reason they had chosen France as their country of studies and their incredible proficiency in French (that made me wonder if French was taught in Malaysia???) still eluded me.

For this reason, I am pleased to get to know more about their story and to share it with you. I thus bring to you Fatin, Sabrina, and their friend Faiz as well –who kindly answered my questions!

Did you know? Malaysia is a country located in South East Asia. Its capital is Kuala Lumpur and its official language is Malay and English is a recognized language, which is why some schools teach their students in English.

To begin with, please take note that France’s and Malaysia’s educational systems are very different. As Fatin explained during our first English class when asked by our teacher, students in Malaysia are offered the opportunity to study abroad by the government. Their choosing France can seem a bit off in a world where English-speaking countries are besieged with an ever growing number of foreign students and that is what is what my first question dealt with.

Me: Why did you decide to study in France and not in another country?

Sabrina: The main reason we chose to study in France is the standard of education which is generally high and the reputation of the academic institutions. France offers a wide range of interesting courses, some of which are not available elsewhere.

Sabrina went on to praise France’s gastronomy and its landscapes, adding that “for passionate foodies, France is the place where you discover great taste and great execution. Not to forget that France is the perfect place for a vacation. It is a very beautiful country; every part of it is breathtaking and unique”.

I then turned to Faiz who shared his own experience of having the opportunity to study abroad right after high school.

Faiz: After getting my SPM results, I got a scholarship offered by the Malaysian government to pursue my studies overseas. Honestly, I randomly chose France as it was the first European country that came to my mind at the time. France’s educational standards are somewhat better than in my home country, especially in engineering. I also wanted to learn a new language, which is why I chose France rather than an Anglo-Saxon country.

Me: By the way, when did you arrive in France?

Fatin: We arrived in 2015, around three years ago. Roughly forty Malaysian students came to France under the program.

Fatin got closer from her friends during the one-year course that took place in Tours. She added that there is a Malaysian students’ association in France that organizes various events for Malaysians to meet and get to know each other. The association, called MASAF, gives tips about the life in France and acts as an intermediate platform for the cohesion of Malaysian students.

Me: Would you say that many Malaysians have the opportunity to study abroad?

Sabrina: To come and study here in France, we had to compete with everyone else to get the national scholarship. It was a challenging process: the outcome greatly depends on your interview performance and your exam results.

Sabrina then explained that it is still possible to study abroad without financial aid from the government, but not everyone can afford to pay the tuition fees since the European currency is higher than the Malaysian ringgit.

You may have picked up that the Malaysian system does not quite work the French one. Faiz mentioned something about the SPM (the Malaysian Certificate of Education) that Fatin then explained more thoroughly.

Me: What are the main differences between France’s and Malaysia’s educational systems?

Fatin: The main difference between the two is that we graduate high school with the SPM which is an equivalent of O-levels (Editor’s note: O-levels are now UK’s GCE and are of a slightly higher level than the French brevet). This explains why we had to do a one-year course when we came to France: to make sure we had the level required by French baccalauréat.

She went on to explain how the Malaysian system works:

Fatin: In Malaysia, after graduating from high school, students can choose to pursue their studies by doing a one-year foundation course or a two-year diploma before continuing with a bachelor’s degree. Other than that, the difference between Malaysia and France is that most of the syllabus in Malaysia is taught in English, which is our second official language, while not a great deal of subjects are taught in Malay, our official language.

If you have ever conversed Faiz, Sabrina or Fatin, it must have come to your mind that they master the French language perfectly. To study in a foreign country is difficult enough with all the cultural differences and the adaptation to a new lifestyle; hence I came to wonder how they came to learn French. Did they have to hit the ground running and learn it on the spot or was French taught in their schools?

Me: How did you learn French exactly? Did you learn it in Malaysia or right here in France?

Sabrina: French isn’t a language widely spoken in Malaysia. Actually, we did not speak French at all before coming to France. Thankfully, we had a year of intensive French classes in Blois or in Tours before entering tertiary education. We keep practicing French in school with friends and teachers and in public. After all, the best way to learn a language is in a country where it’s spoken.

After the one-year course, many Malaysians elected to pursue with a technical degree in an IUT. Sabrina herself chose this path before applying to enter in PRI in Polytech Grenoble, along with Faiz. As for Fatin, she studies in IESE. They are all first year students.

After learning about their background I asked Faiz about his plans for the future. As it turns out, they are all required to serve a 6-year bond in Malaysia, as agreed in the scholarship contract. Apart from that, Faiz does not know in which country he would like to work in the future, but considering his impressive path, there is no doubt that he will find it soon enough.